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31 October 2017

Snow Fairy Body Spray


The Lush community is always torn around Christmas time: those who relish in everything Snow Fairy, and those that roll their eyes and turn the other cheek. While I used to be the former, I am probably far more like the latter group now - although there are still a few formats that get my heart racing and my mouth salivating. 

Snow Fairy Body Spray is a given really, especially with all of the body sprays that have been released this year so far. We've had Twilight; we've been gifted with Rose Jam, so it makes sense that this had to be one of the next ones to rear its head. While many were turn their cheek at this, you cannot deny that £15 for this large bottle of seasonal fragrance is an absolute bargain, and guaranteed to please those fans around the county that have been pining after the perfume for years. 

While I was expecting it to replicate the perfume, I found that the fragrance of the spray was actually far closer to the original body conditioner than anything else. Much like the seasonal gel and last year's Body Conditioner, this spray is super sweet and playful, and may be considered far too sickly some people's tastes. 

For those who aren't familiar with the scent family, Snow Fairy is supposed to smell like pear drops and bubblegum; cotton candy and vanilla musk. There is something both youthful and slightly synthetic about the fragrance. You can smell a syrup-like fruitiness, which does make it very much like a fresh bag of candy floss to my nose, yet the inclusion of the vanilla absolute gives it musky undertones that are a little the delicate sifting of icing sugar. 

Far from being one of Lush's most complex aromas, Snow Fairy Body Spray is still a lovely addition to the family. What I liked about this spray was that it stayed present on my body for a good many hours, and I appreciated the way the warmth of my skin developed the different notes over time. While the initial smell impressed me more than the liquid perfume did, as it was stronger, richer and sweeter, I also liked that the spray matures far better over time. The vanilla and synthetic musk definitely come forward more over the first 30 minutes and create a sweet, warming fragrance that invites short bursts of scent for a good 2-3 hours.

Ultimately, Snow Fairy Body Spray was never going to be a product that I would be overly excited about. However, the fragrance has definitely ignited an interest in the scent family again, and I have been enjoying the shower gel and Body Conditioner alongside this as a result of the spray. Given the pattern of body sprays that have been created so far, it's only a matter of time before Honey I Washed The Kids and The Comforter are created, I'm sure. 

Quantitative Ingredients: DRF Alcohol, Water, Perfume, Glycerine, Synthetic Musk, Limonene, Linalool, Alpha-Isomethyl ionone.

Vegan?: Yes.

2017 Price: £15 each.

Year Of Original Release: 2017.


Scent Family:
Best Washes Wash Card
Bubblegum Lip Scrub
Candy Fluff Ballistic
Candy Fluff Perfume
Candy Fluff Dusting Powder
Fairy Dust Dusting Powder
Father Christmas Bath Bomb
Fluffy Egg Bath Bomb
Godmother Soap
Lush Mechanic Cold-Pressed Soap
Magic Wand Bubble Bar
Melting Marshmallow Moment Bath Oil
Mmmelting Marshmallow Bath Melt
Pink Easter Egg Ballistic
Snow Fairy Body Conditioner
Snow Fairy Body Spray
Snow Fairy Cold-Pressed Soap
Snow Fairy Jelly Bath Bomb
Snow Fairy Lip Tint
Snow Fairy Liquid Perfume
Snow Fairy Naked Body Conditioner
Snow Fairy Naked Shower Gel
Snow Fairy Shower Gel
Snow Fairy Solid Perfume
Snow Fairy Sparkle Jar
Snow Fairy Sparkle Massage Bar



27 October 2017

Snow Fairy Cold-Pressed Soap



Sometimes Lush make decisions that confuse me a little - make me think that perhaps I have little understanding of how they work and what goes into creating a seasonal range. When it came to Snow Fairy Cold Pressed Soap, I was initially perplexed about the purpose of its release - only because Lush Mechanic shares the same scent and is available to purchase freely online across the year. However, the more I delved into my thoughts, the more I began to engage with multiple reasons for why the company have done such a thing. 

Firstly, Lush Mechanic is not readily available across the globe, so this seasonal soap is a great opportunity for Snow Fairy Fans to try out something new in the fragrance. Secondly, the soap will be available in stores - not just online, so consumers have better access to it without feeling like they have to invest in a large order. Finally, as there are so many products with the same smell already, this offers an even bigger expanse for consumers who have a sweet tooth.

Being someone who is very much into healthy eating, I was already aware of what cold-pressed meant in terms of the food industry and how this idea might transpire into a soap. Although most companies tend to heat up their oils, melt them down and mix them together before leaving them to set, cold-pressed is when ingredients are pressed, ground down and mixed together while keeping the temperature low at all times (below 49°C to be precise). The lack of heat used throughout this process means that the oils retain all of their flavour, aroma and nutritional value - making them better for consumption as well as for the skin.

While soaps that have been produced in this fashion tend to be harder because the ingredients are quite heavily compressed together, they tend to have a  longer life span than regular soaps because they contain less liquid - liquid that would normally evaporate over time and dry the soap out. To prove this point, I have had all three of Lush's new cold-pressed soaps for near enough three months now and they have not changed in consistency at all during this time.

Snow Fairy Soap contains a base of coconut, almond and castor oil, along with a generous helping of cocoa butter to soften things up. While I don't find Cold Pressed soaps to be as moisturising as gourmet soaps, there is still something appealing about the thick lather that most seem to create in the shower. This one was no exception - creating creamy, florescent pink suds to massage across the skin. What I really liked about this Soap, was that it even lathered up when I ran it across my body, which some soaps don't do. This meant that I was able prevent my hands from becoming too dry after usage, and the consistency gave me a gentle exfoliation at the same time. 

The inclusion of the synthetic musk is what gives this product its famous Snow Fairy fragrance, although it isn't a direct replica of the shower gel. While sweet and musky, I felt as if the smell of this was more like perfume - in that it wasn't so sickly or as fruity. There is something slightly more grounded about this scent that allows it to be a little more warming than your average Snow Fairy product. 

What was impressive about this limited edition was that, even though I used this directly under the running water, it didn't shrink particularly fast as some of Lush's other seasonal specimens. Furthermore, it was relatively fast at drying afterwards, so I would imagine it would last a good six weeks before needing to be replaced.

Unfortunately, I didn't find that this left my skin as desirable as it needs to be in the winter months. I still needed to moisturise daily, which I don't have to do with other Shower gels and jellies. Having said that, regular readers know my skin type by now, and I know that others I have spoken to have said that it's been moisturising for them. What I will say though is that Snow Fairy Cold Pressed Soap did leave my skin feeling clean and smooth, and maybe a generous helping of the Body Conditioner might have worked well in unison to creating velvet-soft skin.

While the scent did linger on my body afterwards, it was very faint on my skin and didn't stay around for particularly long. Had I paired this with the recently released Body Spray, I might have been able to extend this sweet, delicate experience.

Overall, this cold-Pressed Soap will be a favourite with consumers this year, if only because of the fragrance it pertains, and the cute design - which will definitely appeal to those who like bright, playful colours. This is not one I would buy again, although this is more because it doesn't suit my skin type as opposed to the product being at all bad.

Quantitative Ingredients: Extra Virgin Coconut Oil, Water (Aqua), Sodium Bicarbonate, Sodium Hydroxide, Cream of Tartar, Perfume, Almond Oil, Fair Trade Organic Cocoa Butter, Organic Castor Oil, Glycerine, Tapioca Starch, Citric Acid, Titanium Dioxide, Synthetic Musk, Propylene Glycol, Calcium Sodium Borosilicate, Tin Oxide, *Limonene, Alpha-Isomethyl ionone, Colour 45410, Colour 73360, Colour 45350, Natural Ingredients, Safe Synthetics.

Vegan?: Yes.

2017 Price: £5.95 each.

Year Of Original Release: 2017.


Scent Family:
Best Washes Wash Card
Bubblegum Lip Scrub
Candy Fluff Ballistic
Candy Fluff Perfume
Candy Fluff Dusting Powder
Fairy Dust Dusting Powder
Father Christmas Bath Bomb
Fluffy Egg Bath Bomb
Godmother Soap
Lush Mechanic Cold-Pressed Soap
Magic Wand Bubble Bar
Melting Marshmallow Moment Bath Oil
Mmmelting Marshmallow Bath Melt
Pink Easter Egg Ballistic
Snow Fairy Body Conditioner
Snow Fairy Body Spray
Snow Fairy Cold-Pressed Soap
Snow Fairy Jelly Bath Bomb
Snow Fairy Lip Tint
Snow Fairy Liquid Perfume
Snow Fairy Naked Body Conditioner
Snow Fairy Naked Shower Gel
Snow Fairy Shower Gel
Snow Fairy Solid Perfume
Snow Fairy Sparkle Jar
Snow Fairy Sparkle Massage Bar



23 October 2017

Snow Fairy Naked Body Conditioner



Last year I fell in love with Snow Fairy Body Conditioner, which I was not expecting to do at all. While I have favourite scents and preferred formats, I am always open to being blown away by any of the new releases that Lush grace our lives with, especially when they're as unexpected as this one was. It is for this very reason that I was rather excited by the prospect of Lush's new naked version this Christmas.

As with all of the shower gels and body conditioners this year, Lush have decided to take the self-preserving one step further and release a range of seasonal products that need zero packaging, and therefore create zero waste. While initially skeptical, I have long since realised that this idea is more than just a novelty, and I am excited at the prospect of more variations in the future.

Snow Fairy Naked Body Conditioner is a tub-shaped creation that appears slightly bigger then one of Lush's standard 100g pots. While I appreciate the sentiment and the usability behind this product, and all of Lush's Naked range, it did take me a while to appreciate the rather boring-looking design. I suppose you can't expect an aesthetically perfect cosmetic if you also want something as environmentally friendly as these guys try to be. However, what did impress me about this product was how vibrant and strong the fragrance was from the very first moment I removed the block from my delivery box. 

Fans of Snow Fairy will be pleased to know that the scent is very intact and 'present' in this format. Although I think the normal body Conditioner is perhaps a little sweeter and a tad fruitier on the nose, the naked edition is up there as being one of the strongest versions of this fragrance. While it shares its scent with the whole range, it is the recent body spray and the shower gel that I think this is closest to, which is great in my eyes.

Described as a combination of raspberry bubblegum, candy floss and vanilla musk, the smell of this is a very playful one - exactly what you'd expect if you know this scent well. Given the generous inclusion of the various oils and butters, there is something slightly silky and rather rich about the different notes here, and I would describe the scent as being a little more sultry than the usual youthful aroma. In as many words, the smell suits this format really well, and gives it more depth than in other products, such as the dusting powder, liquid perfume and Jelly Bath Bomb.  

Just like the other naked body conditioners, the idea is that you massage this across your body, while your skin is still wet, before gently patting yourself down with a towel. The butters and oils will not only offer a thin layer of protection against the cold weather, but they'll get to work at moisturising your skin and leaving it soft, smooth and supple for a good many hours. What I love about all of Lush's body conditioners is that the formulas make it harder for the skin to absorb it as quickly as you would a normal body lotion.  For this reason, you are left with a protective barrier over your skin that offers not only a wonderful radiance to your skin, but keeps it feeling and looking more nourished as well.

With all of Lush's solid editions, it's a good idea to not hold or use this directly under the running water, as it'll melt far quicker this way. I found that as long as my skin was already wet, the body conditioner would glide over any area with ease, and the block would naturally melt under the warmth of my skin. You may wish to cut off a small piece with each use, if you'd prefer to keep the rest dry while in storage, as this can and will leave pink smudges on any surface.

How this differed from the normal body lotion, aside from the slight difference in scent, is that this is perhaps not as generous on the skin. The block was, at times, a little stubborn when in use, and I found that I had to massage the product across my body to allow for even coverage. Futhermore, I found that The layer of oils/butters that were left on my skin wasn't as thick or as long lasting. For those who want a light coverage, you'd probably prefer this version. However, for someone who has very dry skin and needs heavy nourishment, the normal version may be more suited. 

Normally, I use my body conditioners as an alternative for shaving cream, as I find I can get a very close shave with nearly all of Lush's range. They not only help to prevent irritation and possible rashes from forming, but they heed results that last longer than using normal shower gel. With this Naked version, I found that It worked well as a shaving cream. However, it did clog up my razor blade more than the regular conditioner seemed to, and I had to keep tapping the blade throughout my shower to clear the mess away.

As a warning, I should add that you'll need to be careful when using this body conditioner as it can leave pink marks on both your skin or the bath walls, that can be stubborn to remove when dried. Moreover, this needs to be stored somewhere carefully in between uses so that it doesn't decorate the shelf it's resting on.

What I will say is that the results of this Naked version are good enough for me to recommend that you give it a go yourself. While I think the regular body conditioner works better overall, has a better scent, and seems to last on the skin slightly longer than this format, I do appreciate that Snow Fairy Naked Body Conditioner has its merits as well, and I do love the fact that it comes with zero packaging. 

Quantitative Ingredients: Fair Trade Organic Cocoa Butter, Cherry Infusion, Fair Trade Shea Butter, Candy Floss Water, Japan Wax, Perfume, Carnauba Wax, Organic Illipe Butter, Organic Jojoba Oil, Avocado Butter, Mango Butter, Almond Oil, Titanium Dioxide, Synthetic Musk, Lauryl Betaine, Calcium Sodium Borosilicate. Tin Oxide, *Limonene, Alpha-Isomethyl ionone, Colour 17200, Colour 45410, Colour 45380:3.

Vegan?: Yes.

2017 Price: £8.25 each.

Year Of Original Release: 2017.


Scent Family:
Best Washes Wash Card
Bubblegum Lip Scrub
Candy Fluff Ballistic
Candy Fluff Perfume
Candy Fluff Dusting Powder
Fairy Dust Dusting Powder
Father Christmas Bath Bomb
Fluffy Egg Bath Bomb
Godmother Soap
Lush Mechanic Cold-Pressed Soap
Magic Wand Bubble Bar
Melting Marshmallow Moment Bath Oil
Mmmelting Marshmallow Bath Melt
Pink Easter Egg Ballistic
Snow Fairy Body Conditioner
Snow Fairy Body Spray
Snow Fairy Cold-Pressed Soap
Snow Fairy Jelly Bath Bomb
Snow Fairy Lip Tint
Snow Fairy Liquid Perfume
Snow Fairy Naked Body Conditioner
Snow Fairy Naked Shower Gel
Snow Fairy Shower Gel
Snow Fairy Solid Perfume
Snow Fairy Sparkle Jar
Snow Fairy Sparkle Massage Bar




21 October 2017

Happy Happy Joy Joy Naked Hair Conditioner




As most of my reviews showcase, I am a big advocate of solid hair care. In fact, it's probably the area of Lush that I am most passionate about, because of how much the company have helped to improve my unmanageable hair after years of abuse. Whenever anyone approaches me about recommendations, I automatically begin reeling off the solid products that would be best suited - not even fathoming that there are also some truly wonderful liquid variations that also deserve a mention.

When the Lush Kitchen announced that they'd be bringing out both Veganese and Happy Happy Joy Joy in solid form, I was ecstatic. Not only are they the only vegan liquid conditioners that Lush currently offer, but they also happen to be the only two conditioners that I use regularly - along with Avocado Co-wash.

HHJJ was the first in the spotlight, with its bobbly consistency and wonky-shaped head. While it wasn't the most attractive product to look at, I was hoping that this naked version would offer something different from the bottled version.


I'll be honest and say that I find HHJJ to be extremely expensive for what it is. While I recognise that Lush have sourced quite a number of highly-regarded ingredients to create the product, a 100g bottle will set you back £9.99, which is extortionate for something that lasts me between 4-5 washes. Not only that but I wouldn't say that it is anywhere near as moisturising as Lush's other solid and liquid conditioners, and maybe even be less nourishing than most of the shop-bought ones that I have also purchased over the years. 

For this reason, I was intrigued to see that this solid edition was £19.95 - which, if it lasted as long as the naked shower gels did, would work out much cheaper to use than the original liquid version. And I just hoped that the inclusion of the extra oils and butters would make this edition a little more moisturing.

Unfortunately, myself and this naked edition didn’t see eye-to-eye from the start. Firstly, I didn’t find that the fragrance was anywhere near the strength that the original liquid version possesses. Given that it’s a ‘conditioning perfume’, you would expect a scent strong enough to boast that title. Needless to say, HHJJ was very weak comparison to its older sibling. 

What took a bit of getting used to with the liquid conditioner was how quickly the product was absorbed into the hair. With its thin consistency I found that if I applied too much in one area, it would disappear too quickly for me to massage across a different area. For this reason, it was very easy to use twice as much product as you originally planned to, which is why I was always super careful when applying it onto the hair. 

When it came to the naked edition, I found that it was rather stubborn to produce much of a lather when massaged directly into the scalp. While it wasn’t particular generous when stimulated between my hands either, at least I wasn’t at risk of using too much of the Conditioner in any one go. I found that the solid bottle produced a thick, almost paste-like lather, although it did take a lot of effort to create enough product to coat all of my hair.  


Upon application, I immediately noticed a difference in how my hair reacted to the product. Normally, HHJJ makes my hair feel rather thin but it feels silky soft and nourished - it quite literally transforms my locks and removes any tangles without me having to use a comb. With the naked edition, my hair felt rather matted and dry, and this made it very wire-like and thin after I had rinsed it out. Even after multiple uses - some applied with an immediate rinse, and other times left in for over 10 minutes, my hair felt brittle and very UN-moisturised. 

Each and every time I tried to brush my hair, I found that it was both limp and frizzy, and lots of hair would come out in the brush. For someone who’s desperately trying to restore my hair to some form of normality, this is the last thing I wanted to happen. Even when I cut off small chunks and worked it into a paste before applying it, I found that it didn’t make much of a difference. 

Ultimately, Happy Happy Joy Joy is not a naked product that worked for me in any way. In fact, I’m rather interested to know why two products with similar ingredients can cause my hair to have two very different reactions. I hope that perhaps there is a product default with this batch, which is why it hasn’t made a reappearance since its Kitchen release, and that it will come back again at some point and win my hair over.

Quantitative Ingredients: ?

Vegan?: Yes.

2017 Price: £19.95 each.

Year Of Original Release: 2017.

Scent Family:
Frozen Bath Bomb
Frozen Liquid Perfume
Frozen Solid Perfume
Shine So Bright Hair Balm






18 October 2017

The Snowman Bubbleroon




I cannot think of The Snowman without hearing the incredible voice of Aled Jones', singing Walking In The Air, echoing around in my head. However, this isn't a bad thing at all. Memories of that song stretch right across my childhood, my teens and into my adulthood - it holds a place in my heart that this limited edition bubbleroon has since joined.

As I'm always attracted to the damaged ones, my Snowman Bubbleroon arrived with a missing eye. However, regular ones are supposed to sport two juniperberry eyes and a miniature orange nose for decoration. This seasonal darling is the perfect festive accompaniment for the bath, as not only does it offer a soft and gentle fragrance to enjoy, but it'll leave your skin beautifully pampered and ready to face the winter weather. 

While they share similar names and designs, this does not share its scent with the discontinued Melting Snowman Bath Melt. However, it does share one thing in common, which is that although both exclusives look rather colourless, they're both amazing at moisturising the skin. After using one of these, I could feel an immediate difference to my skin, particularly on my hands and feet, which felt so soft and silky smooth.

For those not familiar with the concept of a bubbleroon, Lush took the idea of a macaroon delicacy - two biscuits sandwiched together with a creamy filling - and made a cosmetic version. As with all of their previous reincarnations, this one is sandwiched together with a delicious centre of cocoa and shea butter, which normally makes it more softening than a regular bubble bar.

The Snowman features both Sicilian lemon and lemon myrtle oil to offer a gentle, lemony aroma in the bath. The bubbleroon is neither citrusy or zesty at all, and I wouldn't describe it as being particularly fruity either. In fact, the inclusion of the soya milk adds a creamy element to the fragrance that reminds me very much of Granny Takes A Dip, just without the heat of the ginger or pepper.

What is great about this seasonal bubbleroon is that it melts really slowly in the water, even if (like me) you like your bath scolding-hot. It took a good twenty minutes to fully dissolve in the water, which meant that the scent was consistent throughout the experience and the water continued to soften from beginning to end.

The downfall of this little fella is that he's rather heavy, so will sink to the bottom of the tub, unless you hold him. It would have been nice to watch him float across the surface, just because I normally find bath melts relaxing to watch as I'm submerged beneath the water. 

Having said that, The Snowman is big enough to use across at least two baths, which makes him great value for money; his scent is gentle enough to sooth so and relax you, while still offering enough fragrance to detect while you're in the bath; and he's moisturising enough to leave your skin looking and feeling really soft and clean after you've towelled yourself down.

While I told myself that I wasn't going to purchase any more of the seasonal range because of my current financial situation, I will be grabbing a couple of these to see me through the next couple of months. This is definitely one I hope will make a reappearance next year, as my skin can rely on his magic to replenish and nourish the winter blues away.

Quantitative Ingredients: Sodium Bicarbonate, Cream of Tartar, Sodium Laureth Sulfate, Fair Trade Organic Cocoa Butter, Lauryl Betaine, Cornflour, Sicilian Lemon Oil, Lemon Myrtle Oil, Styrax Oil, Fair Trade Shea Butter, Soya Milk Powder, Titanium Dioxide, Laureth 4, *Citral, *Limonene, Perfume, Colour 15510, Dried Juniperberries.

Vegan?: Yes.

2017 Price: £4.25 each.

Year of Original Release: 2017.


16 October 2017

Ro's Argan Naked Body Conditioner



Would you believe that I have never bought myself a tub of Ro’s Argan Body Conditioner? Whenever I’ve found myself with a small pot to indulge in, it’s always been from a gift set of given to me by someone else. Unbelievable really, when you consider the fact that it’s one of my favourite products in Lush’s regular range.

Unfortunately, the same can’t be said for the naked version - not only because it has only ever been released in the Lush Kitchen, and was a one-off exclusive that hasn’t appeared in shops yet, but also because it is very different from the original, in so many ways, and I am not a particularly big advocate of the changes made.

Supposedly sharing its scent with the Rose Jam family, this limited edition Naked Body Conditioner sports a shade of pretty pink and has been decorated with a single dried rose leaf across the top. Strangely, I found that the colour of this dwindled quite dramatically when I began using it, and within 2-3 uses the block was almost white colour. While I don't oppose to using simple-coloured products, I was perplexed as to why this happened, given that it hasn't done so for any of the other conditioners I have used to date. 

For those who are new to Lush and haven't yet appreciated the Rose Jam aroma, the scent family is made up of rose, argan, lemon and geranium oils. This gives the products with this fragrance a wonderful sweet, floral, 'jammy' rose aroma. The inclusion of the argan oil usually gives the products a richness that surpasses a 'typical' rose smell, while the lemon and rose oils create a naturally sweet and almost edible-smelling floral smell. In some products, such as the original body conditioner, the geranium also offers a warm, rich, cloudy layer of floral as well, almost this is not always as prominent in other formats. 

The reason I have described Rose Jam in such a way is because Ro's Argan Naked Body Conditioner contained next to none of these wonderful components. Upon first sniff, I was surprised and equally a little frustrated that the main note I could detect was the cocoa butter. Instead of the sweet, salivating-inducing rose smell I was expecting, I was instead greeted with an almost chocolately rose smell. 

Don't get me wrong: there is nothing wrong with a combination of rose and chocolate. However, I felt as if the cocoa butter took away from the richness of the rose aroma, and the floral elements were also dampened because of it, meaning that the wonderful Rose Jam scent that I was looking forward to was very distorted and different. 

As with all of the naked products, you can choose to use them as a whole, which I have tended to do, or cut them into chunks and use a small piece each time. As with both Bucks Fizz and Snow Fairy Body Conditioners, I simply wet them slightly so that the oils and butters were stimulated by the heat, and then massaged Ro's Argan across the skin. 

Much like the aforementioned naked conditioners, this one melted with ease and coated my skin with a generous layer of product to soften and smooth my skin with. In fact, I would recommend that perhaps you glide this block only partly over the skin and then massage the rest in with your hands. I only say this because this body conditioner tended to shrink far quicker than the other variations and I think it had something to do with the fact that I didn't heed my own advice. 

What is disappointing is that this body conditioner worked so well on my body, the scent really prevented this from being perhaps my favourite naked body conditioner of the lot. My skin felt super-soft and deeply nourished almost immediately, after applying this, and when I used it in replacement of a shaving cream, I experienced a really close shave and moisturised skin to boot. Aside from the scent, I was disappointed to find that the fragrance of this was soon lost after application, and I certainly couldn't smell it when I exited the bath/shower. 

Ultimately, Ro's Argan Naked Body Conditioner could have been my favourite rendition of the naked range, if only the fragrance had been perfected a little better. While my skin looked and felt really nourished afterwards, I can imagine my main grudge is the reason that this hasn't yet made it in stores. Hopefully with a few changes in the factory, this potentially-perfect product will make its way into the regular range. 

Quantitative Ingredients:

Vegan?: Yes. 

2017 Price: £8.95 each.

Year Of Original Release: 2017. 




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